Posts about: Golden Ears Park

Mount Nutt

 

Mount Nutt is in Golden Ears Provincial Park and the trail was made between 2011 and 2013 by Alan Lizee and the Ridge Meadows Outdoor Club. The first 1.6 km from the parking lot is a very gentle slope on a gravel path (East Canyon Trail), which is a good warm up. At the 1.6 km mark, you take a right turn into the forest and the vertical gain really starts – suddenly you find yourself heading up fast – well not that fast ! The trail is very well marked (can be slippery when wet). For a while, the climb follows a small creek, which drains a small lake further up.

The lake is nice and the area around it gives you a little reprieve from the gruelling climb. Soon after leaving the lake area, the climb continues. Eventually, we reached a viewpoint (680 m), which offered a pretty good view of Alouette Lake.

Continuing along the ridge, you are treated with about 4 more viewpoints overlooking Golden Ears, Evans Valley, Edge Peak and Alouette Lake, among others. The trail ends before the true summit. We couldn’t find a trail to the summit, but some people have done it.

The Stats:

Distance: 10.7 km (return)
Low point: 160 m
High point: 1150 m
Elevation gain: 990 m
Trailhead/parking: 49° 20’ 4” by  122° 27’ 24.5” (Google Map)

The route…

The Photos:

Golden Ears
Golden Ears
End of Trail view
End of Trail view
Viewpoint
Viewpoint



Garter Snake
Garter Snake
Alouette Lake
Alouette Lake
East end of Alouette Lake
East end of Alouette Lake
Edge peak and Evans Valley
Edge peak and Evans Valley

First Viewpoint



Forest canopy
Forest canopy
Inside of a burnt tree
Inside of a burnt tree
Lake
Lake
View of Alouette Lake at first viewpoint
View of Alouette Lake at first viewpoint

★★★★★★★★★★★

Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.
To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

★★★★★★★★★★★

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    Gold Creek Falls

     

    This has got to be one of the most popular hikes in Golden Ears Provincial Park. Due to its easy, flat trail, stunning views and waterfall at the end, this hike even family friendly. The hike starts at the East Canyon Parking lot and follows the Lower Falls Trail. The trail is mostly shaded by the trees and follows Gold Creek. Stop ever so often to check out the views and even go in the creek on a hot day.  At the end of the 2.6 km trail, you are treated with stunning views of Gold Creek Falls. There is also an Upper Falls, but the trail is much rougher than the Lower Falls Trail and is not recommended for family travel.

    The stats:

    Distance: 5.2 km (return)
    Time: 1-2 hours
    Low point: 160 m
    High point: 237 m
    Elevation gain: 77 m
    Parking/Trailhead: 49° 19’ 38″ by 122° 27’ 47” (Google Map)

    The route:

    The Photos:

    Gold Creek Falls
    Gold Creek Falls
    Gold Creek
    Gold Creek
    Gold Creek
    Gold Creek



    Stop along side the Creek
    Stop along side the Creek
    Sun shining over the creek
    Sun shining over the creek
    The rocks at the Lower Falls
    The rocks at the Lower Falls

    ★★★★★★★★★★★

    Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

    Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

    For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.
    To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

    ★★★★★★★★★★★

    Share and Enjoy

      Evans Valley Snow Caves

       

      Another trip back to beautiful Golden Ears Provincial Park. To find the snow caves in Evans Valley, you have to have good timing. Too early in the year, there may be too much snow (and also avalanche risks), too late and the caves are all gone. I find social media, such as Instagram is a great resource to find recent conditions – that’s what I did and with a great weekend in the forecast, I set out for the snow caves.

      The hike starts at the West Canyon trailhead. After a 2 km hike up the West Canyon, you will need to take a left turn at the Evans Valley Trail, which is not marked well. At times the trail goes through thick salmonberry, but it’s not too bad. The trail continues climbing up Evans Valley, alongside the creek. After another 1.5 km of hiking, the forest trail ends and you start hiking up the boulder field – there is no set path, just go and watch for loose boulders. You will hike up the boulder field for over 1 km and reach the head of the valley – this is the magical place – All of a sudden, we saw two huge snow caves – The first one on our right was inaccessible, but we stopped for a bit before going on. The second snow cave is up a small valley to the east. After a short climb up boulders again, we were standing beside a giant snow cave. As I walked in water was dripping like rain from the edge and ceiling of the cave, the temperature dropped like being in a refrigerator – refreshing for a hot day ! We spent some time in the cave for some photos and then proceeded down again. We meet no one else on the trail today !

      The Stats:

      Distance: 9.5 km (return)
      Time: 6 hours (lots of breaks and exploring)
      Low point: 185 m
      High point: 745 m
      Elevation gain: 560 m
      Cumulative Elevation gain: 800 m
      Trailhead: 49° 19’ 38″ by  122° 27’ 47” (Google Map)

      The route:

      The photos:

      Snow Cave 1
      Snow Cave 1
      Snow Cave 1
      Snow Cave 1
      View down valley
      View down valley



      Snow Cave 2
      Snow Cave 2
      Snow Cave 2
      Snow Cave 2
      Inside Snow Cave 2
      Inside Snow Cave 2



      Inside Snow Cave 2
      Inside Snow Cave 2
      Hiking up boulder field
      Hiking up boulder field
      A view up the boulder field
      A view up the boulder field
      Wild Blueberries
      Wild Blueberries
      A butterfly stopped to say hello
      A butterfly stopped to say hello



      Western Columbine
      Western Columbine
      Columbia Lily
      Columbia Lily
      Thick salmonberry
      Thick salmonberry
      Purple flower
      Purple flower

      ★★★★★★★★★★★

      Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

      Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

      For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.
      To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

      ★★★★★★★★★★★

      Share and Enjoy

        Alder Flats

         

        Alder Flats at Golden Ears Provincial Park is known as a resting stop prior to ascending Golden Ears peak. The views just above Alder Flats are amazing. This hike ends at a clearing about 100 m over the Alder Flats campsite. The clearing allows for amazing views of Golden Ears. This is one a many great hikes in Golden Ears Provincial Park. With the addition of the new bridge over Gold Creek, it is possible to do this hike in a loop, which is what we did today. We left cars at both East and West Canyon trailheads. We started up the Lower Falls trail (which parallels the East Canyon Trail), we then headed through a rugged trail, which is sparsely marked, but then made it up to East Canyon Trail. Shortly thereafter, we crossed the new bridge and started making some elevation gain. About an hour later we were at Alder Flats. The viewpoint above Alder Flats is a short hike a little further up.

        The stats:

        Distance: 13.4 km
        Time: 5 hours (including rests)
        Low point: 151 m
        High point: 585 m
        Elevation gain: 543 m
        Cumulative Elevation gain: 875 m
        East Canyon Trailhead: 49° 20’ 0” by  122° 27’ 26.5” (Google Map)
        West Canyon Trailhead: 49° 19’ 38.5” by  122° 27’ 46” (Google Map)

        The route…

        The photos…

        Golden Ears Peak from viewpoint over Alder Flats…
        Golden Ears Peak

        Viewpoint over Alder Flats…
        IMG_4200

        Creek at Alder Flats…
        Creek at Alder Flats



        Gold Creek Bridge…
        Gold Creek bridge

        Gold Creek from the bridgeGold Creek from the bridge

        Gold Creek Viewpoint on West Canyon Trail…
        Gold Creek viewpoint

        Gold Creek…
        Gold Creek



        Golden Ears up close…
        IMG_4211ps

        Snowfields…
        IMG_4231

        An old sign…
        Old sign

        There are many small bridges…
        Small bridge

        ★★★★★★★★★★★

        Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

        Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

        For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.
        To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

        ★★★★★★★★★★★

        Share and Enjoy