Posts about: Non-Buntzen Lake Hikes

Sasamat Lake

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    Sasamat Lake is in Belcarra Regional Park, near Anmore. This is one of the warmest lakes in Metro Vancouver ! There is a nice easy trail around the lake, with minimal elevation gain. This place can get very crowded in the summer because it has two great sandy beaches (White Pine Beach). There is a very sturdy floating bridge across the lane with two wharves for fishing or jumping off. The lake has an area of about 45 ha (111 acres) and a perimeter of 3.2 kms.

    Distance: 3 km
    Time: variable
    Low point: 51 m
    High point: 74 m
    Elevation gain: 23 m
    Trailhead and parking: 49° 19’ 21.5” by 122° 53’ 03” (Google Maps and navigation)

    The route with downloadable gpx…

    Here are some photos of the Lake…

    1
    Walkway along Lake

     

    2
    Floating Bridge

     

    3
    Wharves on floating bridge

     

    4
    Glassy surface on Sasamat Lake

     

    5
    White Pine Beach

     

    6
    Tree in the water

     

    7
    View from a wharf

     

    8
    Sun shining over Sasamat Lake

     

    9
    The Floating Bridge at Sasamat Lake

     

    Beach
    White Pine Beach at Sasamat Lake

     

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      Oyster Dome

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        The Oyster Dome hike is in the Chuckanut Mountain Range, a short distance south of Bellingham, Washington. There are a number of trails in the mountain and we extended our hike and visited North Bluff, Lily Lake and Lizard Lake. On the way back, we took Max’s Shortcut (which isn’t really a shortcut, but is a nice gentle slope down).

        We started the hike at the recommended spot at the Samish Overlook parking lot (see link below).
        NOTE: There is a 6 km (3.8 mi) gravel road to travel on to reach the parking lot. The road is fine for most vehicles – just take it slow as there are some big potholes.

        From the parking lot, there is already a great view of Samish Bay. The first viewpoint on the trail is Oyster Dome, Which took us about 1.5 hours to reach. About 30 mins after leaving the Oyster Dome viewpoint, we arrived at Lily Lake for a quick visit. After Lily Lake, our destination was North Bluff, another 30 mins away. These bluffs are great stopping point and it’s here we had lunch. Following an extended visit to North Bluff, we made our way to Lizard Lake, which we arrived at in 20 minutes. At Lizard Lake, we saw three horses and their riders. After the visit to Lizard Lake, we headed back via Max’s Shortcut.

        NOTE: You will need a Discover Pass to park here.
        For more about the Discover Pass, go here…

        A Discover Pass can be purchased in advance online at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Website.

        Border crossing tips: Bring passport, Nexus or enhanced ID !!; no fruit, no veges, no meat (this isn’t a complete list !); trailmix is okay. There is an IGA just across the border if you want to get some fruit or a sandwich for your hike.

        A great resource for current conditions for this hike is the WTA website.
        Check it OUT !!!

        The stats:

        Distance: 13 km (loop)
        Time: 5.5 hours (including lunch and many breaks)
        Low point: 334 m
        High point: 677 m
        Elevation gain: 333 m
        Cumulative Elevation gain: 685 m
        Trailhead and Parking: 48° 36’ 29.5” by 122° 25’ 59” (Google Map)

        The route (with downloadable gps)…

        The Photos…

        Oyset Dome viewpoint
        Oyster Dome viewpoint
        Trail
        Trail
        View near North Bluff
        View near North Bluff
        View near North Bluff
        View near North Bluff
        Forest
        Forest
        Horse at Lizard Lake
        Horse at Lizard Lake
        Lily lake
        Lily lake
        Lizard Lake
        Lizard Lake
        Mt. Baker
        Mt. Baker
        Trees
        Trees
        View from Samish Overlook
        View from Samish Overlook
        View from Samish Overlook
        View from Samish Overlook
        Neat rock
        Neat rock
        Hang glider
        Hang glider

        ★★★★★★★★★★★

        Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

        Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

        For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.

        To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

        ★★★★★★★★★★★

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          Table Mountain

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            Table Mountain, in the Mt. Baker area, must be one of the easier hikes here, but the payoff is simply spectacular.  The trail starts at Artist Point, 12 km northeast of the Mount Baker summit. Artist Point is the starting point for a number of great hikes, such as Ptarmigan Ridge and Chain Lakes.  And a bonus… the road to Artist point is paved the entire way !!

            The trail starts from the west side of the parking lot at Artist Point. Watch for the sign for Table Mountain. Soon, you will start heading up via switchbacks carved into the side of the mountain. The views here are amazing and never stop ! There is quite a drop off from the trail, but I found it pretty safe. I would be weary of bringing small children. Dogs are not allowed on this trail. Once at the top, the trail meanders though scree and vegetated areas, finally terminating at a couple of small tarns (very small). There is a lesser used trail that continues here and joins up with the Chain Lakes trail, but it is pretty rough and would require some scrambling (which is always more difficult going down). From this point, most people just turn around and go back.

            Remember – You will need a Northwest Forest Pass, which can be purchased in person at the Glacier Public Service Center at 10091 Mt. Baker Highway,Glacier, WA (Link to Map)

            Or you can buy an epass in advance online at the Discover Your Northwest website

            Border crossing tips: Bring passport, Nexus or enhanced ID !!; no fruit, no veges, no meat (this isn’t a complete list !); trailmix is okay. There is an IGA just across the border if you want to get some fruit or a sandwich for your hike.

            A great resource for current conditions for this hike is the WTA website.
            Check it OUT !!!

            The location of Artist Point is HERE

            The stats:

            Distance: 4 km (linear return)
            Time: 3 hours
            Low point: 1545 m
            High point: 1741 m
            Elevation gain: 196 m
            Trailhead: 48° 50’ 47.6” by 121° 41’ 36.6” (Google Map)

            The route (with downloadable gps)…

            The Photos…

            A photo I took on the drive up…

            Morning Sun over Mt. Shuksan
            Morning Sun over Mt. Shuksan
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker on trail
            Mt. Baker on trail
            Mt. Baker
            Mt. Baker
            Small tarns
            Small tarns
            Snow melt
            Snow melt
            Still lots of snow
            Still lots of snow
            Table Mountain
            Table Mountain
            Trail
            Trail
            Trail
            Trail
            View from Top
            View from Top
            View from Top
            View from Top
            View from Top
            View from Top
            View from Top
            View from Top
            Alpine ferns
            Alpine ferns

            Here is a long video with stills and video…

            ★★★★★★★★★★★

            Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

            Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

            For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.

            To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

            ★★★★★★★★★★★

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              Horseshoe Bend

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                The Horseshoe Bend trail is located just off the Mt. Baker Highway, a short distance northeast of the Town of Glacier. The trail starts on banks of the North Fork of the Nooksack River (originates from the glaciers of Mount Shuksan). This trail follows the river, crossing a number of ravines and at the highest, you are 100 m high over the Nooksack River. This is a great little trail, with some nice views and peaceful surroundings.

                And while, you’re in the area, I suggest you take a look at the nearby Nooksack Falls.
                It’s only 10 km (6 miles) away ! I have a photo below…
                The location is on NF-33, just off the Mt. Baker Highway.
                The location of Parking Lot is HERE

                Remember – You will need a Northwest Forest Pass, which can be purchased in person at the Glacier Public Service Center at 10091 Mt. Baker Highway, Glacier, WA (Link to Map)

                Or you can buy an epass in advance online at the Discover Your Northwest website

                Border crossing tips: Bring passport, Nexus or enhanced ID !!; no fruit, no veges, no meat (this isn’t a complete list !); trailmix is okay. There is an IGA just across the border if you want to get some fruit or a sandwich for your hike.

                A great resource for current conditions for this hike is the WTA website.
                Check it OUT !!!

                The location of Parking Lot and trailhead is HERE

                The stats:

                Distance: 5 km (linear return)
                Time: 1-3 hours
                Low point: 299 m
                High point: 389 m
                Elevation gain: 90 m
                Cumulative Elevation gain: 330 m
                Trailhead: 48° 54’ 8.7” by 121° 54’ 42.2” (Google Map)

                The route (with downloadable gps)…

                The Photos…

                Nooksack River and mountain
                Nooksack River and mountain
                Nooksack River and trail
                Nooksack River and trail
                Nooksack River
                Nooksack River

                Trail

                Trail
                Trail
                Steep cliff
                Steep cliff
                Nooksack River
                Nooksack River
                Nooksack River
                Nooksack River
                Nooksack Falls
                Nooksack Falls

                ★★★★★★★★★★★

                Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

                Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

                For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.

                To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

                ★★★★★★★★★★★

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                  Widgeon Falls

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                    Widgeon Falls is a special place. This trip requires a canoe/kayak trip and a short hike to get to. Widgeon Falls is in Pinecone Burke Provincial Park. The canoe/kayak trip starts at north west corner of the Pitt-Addington Marsh in Pitt Meadows. The trip takes you across the Pitt River and into Widgeon Creek. When I did the trip, the water level in Widgeon Creek was low, which meant, sometimes we would have get out and drag the canoe. So, it’s advisable to take sandals for the canoe/kayak trip.  The paddling ends at the Widgeon Creek campground and this is where the easy 3 km hike to the falls starts. The trail is easy to follow.

                    Tips:

                    • After crossing the Pitt River, stay to the right – the water is deeper here and you are less likely to get grounded.
                    • The canoe rental place is first come, first serve, cash only ($55 in 2017).
                    • Canoes rent out fast on nice summer days and weekends.
                    • Go on a weekday to avoid crowds if possible.
                    • You can take the road trail on your return hike for less ups and downs
                    • Pack sandals for your canoe trip.

                    The Stats:

                    Distance (canoe/kayaking): 4.5 km X 2 = 9 km
                    Distance (hiking): 3 km X 2 = 6 km
                    Distance (total): 15 km
                    Time (canoe/kayaking): 1 to 1.5 hours X 2 = 2 to 3 hours
                    Time (hiking): about 1 hour X 2 = 2 hours
                    Time (total moving): about 5 hours
                    Low point: 5 m
                    High point: 95 m
                    Elevation gain: 90 m
                    Parking and start of canoe/kayak: 49° 20’ 56.3” by 122° 36’ 58.4” (Google Maps and navigation)

                    The route with downloadable gpx…

                    The photos…

                    Widgeon Falls
                    Widgeon Falls
                    Canoeing
                    Canoeing
                    A great swimming hole
                    A great swimming hole
                    Great place to swim
                    Great place to swim
                    Canoeing
                    Canoeing
                    Canoes at the campground
                    Canoes at the campground
                    Crystal clear
                    Crystal clear
                    Widgeon Creek
                    Widgeon Creek
                    Trail
                    Trail

                     

                    ★★★★★★★★★★★

                    Before heading out on your hike, make sure you are well prepared. This means, having the TEN ESSENTIALS. It is also important to leave a trip plan (route details and estimated return time) with someone you trust.

                    Bring your smartphone, fully charged and put it in airplane mode while hiking. I always bring back-up battery packs for extra piece of mind. It is highly recommended that you bring a GPS device; I use my smartphone with a GPS app (Backcountry Navigator). The GPS will work in airplane mode. Learn how to use it before your hike.

                    For anyone new to hiking, there is a rule to which hikers follow; it is called “Leave No Trace” or LNT. The concept is generally to pack out what you pack in and respect nature, so all future visitors can enjoy what you have enjoyed.

                    To learn more about LNT, please check out this BLOG by a certified LNT Trainer.

                    ★★★★★★★★★★★

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